erik lundegaard

Tossed

Bummer.

Hollywood Elsewhere, via Variety, reports that Sony chief Amy Pascal has pulled the plug on “Moneyball,” the Steven Soderbergh adaptation of Michael Lewis' book, which was to star Brad Pitt as Oakland A's GM Billy Beane, and which was to begin shooting Monday. Earlier this month, Patrick Goldstein, expressing enthusiasm for the project, wrote about how it would adhere closely to the book. Maybe that was the problem. Too cerebral? Too much about baseball? Neither of which (baseball, cerebral) plays well in international markets?

Jeffrey Wells, for one, is doubtful:

What this seems to mean is either that (a) Pascal doesn't believe that stars like Pitt mean all that much when it comes to opening a costly film — that the movie itself has to have the commercial goods or it's not worth doing, or that (b) she's half-persuaded that the 46 year-old Pitt — 50 in four and a half years! — isn't much of a star any more. Or a combination of both.

Who knows? Maybe Pascal knew she was taking a chance with Soderbergh, and, after the relative failures of two recent Sony offerings, “Pelham” and “Year One,” she wasn't in the chance-taking mood.

As I said: Bummer. With that talent, and that source material, I had high hopes the movie would be good. Certainly better than “Deuce Bigalow: European Gigilo,” “Stealth,” “Bewitched,” “Guess Who” or “RV,” all of which Sony/Columbia, and presumably Pascal, not only greenlit but opened in more than 3,000 theaters in recent years.


Posted at 07:48 PM on Sun. Jun 21, 2009 in category Movies - Box Office  
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COMMENTS

Mister B wrote:

Given how well the Athletics draw at their home park, I'm thinking a movie about "Moneyball" would bomb at the box office, but still manage to pick up an Oscar -- once every few years or so. :)
Comment posted on Sun. Jun 21, 2009 at 10:57 PM

Hopscotch wrote:

I read the book and loved it. I could sorta see a movie structure around Billy Beane himself. But it'd be hard. Most biographies, as well know, don't lend themselves to a three-act structure (unless big portions are removed or heavy creative licenses are taken) Frankly, I hope this just encourages more people too read the book.
Comment posted on Mon. Jun 22, 2009 at 05:07 PM

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