erik lundegaard

The Debate

We had a good debate party here on First Hill last night, lots of folks, drinks, kids running around and chasing the cat, poor Jellybean, who hid most of the evening but responded well in the quiet afterwards. No ill effects at basically being the tiny Paul McCartney being chased by grasping and clomping Jellybeaniacs everywhere.

As for the debate itself, I thought both sides did well, but my guy — Barack, in case you haven’t been paying attention — did better. He was smart, articulate, tough but civil. He looked presidential. John McCain was rude and crotchety and refused to even look at his opponent. And while he demonstrated extensive foreign policy expertise, nothing he said, either about foreign affairs or the economy, indicated any change in the direction we’ve been going in, disastrously, for the last eight years.

So basically: Barack refuted the concerns that undecideds had about him (that he wasn’t up to the task) while McCain exacerbated the concerns that undecideds had about him (that, in terms of policy, he was an older and more crotchety version of Bush, and will offer nothing in terms of change).

Links:

  • Andrew Sullivan’s live blogging of the debate
  • Footage of a Fox News(!) focus group of independents that gave the debate to Barack
  • An article on why and where Barack won. By a 62-32 margin, voters felt he was more in touch with their needs and concerns. But here’s the bigger number: “The CBS poll of undecideds has more confirmatory detail. Obama went from a +18 on “understanding your needs and problems” before the debate to a +56 (!) afterward. And he went from a -9 on “prepared to be president” to a +21.”
  • Finally, Michael Seitzman over at HuffPost has a great post about what exactly it is that Barack is bringing that is so appealing and that we haven’t seen in national politics, or even national life, for so long: Grace.

Posted at 10:26 AM on Sat. Sep 27, 2008 in category Politics  
Tags: , , ,

COMMENTS

Mister B wrote:

"Beep. Hi, this is John McCain's phone. John's not going to get the call that suspending his campaign is not going to make a dent in solving the financial crisis because he's stuck in this New York skyscraper after blowing off the Letterman show.

"Maybe if everyone had one of those phones that everyone used on "The Waltons", he'd look a bit less out-of-touch with current technology -- and realize that deregulation is actually hurting this economy.

(turning to yell at McCain who's giving everyone a low thumbs-up)

"Hey, John! You gotta raise your arms above your shoulders! Otherwise, you just look like you're in traction!"
Comment posted on Wed. Oct 01, 2008 at 12:39 AM

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