erik lundegaard

On the Boat to America with Charlie Chaplin and Stan Laurel

My Christmas present to myself this year was “Chaplin's Mutual Comedies: 1916-1917,” which includes both DVD and Blu-Ray, as well as (the clincher), a 63-minute doc, “The Birth of the Tramp,” about his early years. 

The restoration on these films is wonderful, the shots of America at the turn of the century amazing. Hats everywhere. But it's all crystal clear. 

America, 1900

America, turn of the last century, when being filmed was a new thing.

I saw some of the Mutual comedies at the Grand Illusion theater in Seattle the week the Iraq War started, and absolutely loved them. I remember it being an oasis. Nearly 100-year-old Charlie was a kind of sanity for me in insane times. 

In that 63-minute doc, it's mentioned that when Chaplin came over to America in the fall of 1910 as the principal player of Fred Karno's troupe of actors, one of the other actors accompanying him, his understudy, was a kid named Stan Jefferson. Who became Stan Laurel. What are the odds? I guess Karno knew—or knew how to develop—talent.

Charlie Chaplin and Stan Laurel on the boat to America, 1910

Chaplin (framed by life preserver) and Laurel (same row, left) on the boat to America.

Charlie Chaplin and Stan Laurel in America, 1910

Laurel and Chaplin (center) in America in 1910, about to get in on the ground floor of a new business.

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Posted at 05:56 PM on Thu. Jan 08, 2015 in category Movies  
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