erik lundegaard

Seattle Mariners posts

Friday December 06, 2013

Just Say No to Cano: An Imaginary Conversation with a Seattle Mariners Fan

Apologies in advance for this exercise in dialogue.

  • Hey, I read the Mariners are interested in this Cano Robinson character.
  • Robinson Cano.
  • Right. He must be great. What with the money they’re offering him?
  • I heard $225 million over nine seasons.
  • A quarter of a billion dollars! Wow. He must be great.
  • He is.
  • He must be the most valuable player in baseball. He probably wins those awards all the time, right? The MVPs?
  • Actually he’s never won one. He’s come close the last couple years. Third in the voting in 2010, sixth in 2011, fourth in 2012 and fifth in 2013. But no, nothing on the mantle.
  • But he’s always good, right? Perennial All-Star.
  • Five All-Stars in nine years. So half-perennial.
  • But a league leader.
  • He’s never led the league in anything.
  • Really?
  • Games played once. In 2009. But that’s, you know, the attendance award. Although attendance does matter. But he’s often in the top five in many categories, both offensive and defensive.
  • So is he young then? With the chance to improve?
  • He turned 31 in October.
  • Is that young?
  • That’s when players begin to decline, generally.
  • And we’re offering how many years?
  • Nine.
  • Until he’s 40?
  • Yes.
  • Why are we doing that?
  • I don't know.
  • Do we think we have a chance to win in the next few years? When he’ll still be in his prime?
  • Doubtful. The Mariners won 71 games last year. There’s a stat, WAR, or wins above replacement, that measures how many wins a particular player is worth over an average replacement. Cano had one of the highest in the league last year: 7.6. But the Mariners primary second baseman, rookie Nick Franklin, had a 2.3 WAR, so the swap wouldn’t even be worth seven victories. It wouldn’t even make the M’s a .500 team.
  • Are long-term deals like this common in baseball?
  • Unfortunately.
  • Do they work out?
  • Rarely.
  • So ... why?
  • [Shrugs] To be honest, I was hoping the Yankees, Cano's team, would offer him this kind of deal.
  • I thought you didn't like the Yankees.
  • I don't.
  • So you thought such a deal would ...
  • ... hurt them in the long run.
  • And now your team is offering such a deal.
  • The irony.

Opinions may vary.

Robinson Cano

Cano watching his 2011 season end early. If he comes to Seattle, he should get used to this feeling.

Posted at 08:05 AM on Dec 06, 2013 in category Seattle Mariners
Tags: ,
No Comments yet   |   Permalink  
Tuesday December 03, 2013

Chuck Armstrong Retires, Lauded for Never Winning Pennant

Here's AP's story on the retirement of Mariners president Chuck Armstrong. Annotations are mine.

SEATTLE — Seattle Mariners president Chuck Armstrong announced Monday he will retire at the end of January after spending 28 of the past 30 seasons in that position with the ballclub, helping stabilize the team in the Pacific Northwest. 30 seasons, zero penannts. Can't get much more stable.

Armstrong built the Mariners into a contender then faced criticism for the past dozen seasons without a playoff appearance. Oh c'mon. He received criticism way before then. He will retire effective Jan. 31 and the club said it is beginning the process of finding a successor and starting that transition. Ten years late, but what the hell.

“Since day one, he has given his heart and soul to Mariners baseball. And yet ... He sincerely cares about the game of baseball, this organization, this city and this region,” Mariners CEO Howard Lincoln said. And yet ... “On behalf of ownership and everyone who has worked here for the past 30 years, I thank Chuck for his tremendous contributions.” Which were ... ?

The 71-year-old Armstrong joined the franchise as team president in 1983 and, outside of a two-year stint in the early 1990s, has been with the club in that role since. Yes, he has. Boy, has he ever.

“This was a very difficult, very personal decision, but I know in my heart that it's time to turn the page and move to the next chapter of my life,” he said. You're a slow reader, Chuck.

Armstrong first joined the club following the 1983 season under then-owner George Argyros. Homonym: arduous. His most famous move during his first stint was making the decision to draft Ken Griffey Jr. with the first pick of the 1987 amateur draft. Well, thanks to Roger Jongewaard and Dick Balderson, but sure. Armstrong left the club in 1990-91 when Jeff Smulyan owned the team and its future in Seattle was tenuous, but he returned to the job in 1992 after he helped in the Baseball Club of Seattle purchasing the franchise, the first step in keeping the club in Seattle. Or in threatening to take the club out of Seattle.

Armstrong was instrumental in getting Safeco Field built (see: threat, above), a move that solidified the franchise and came during the best run of success in franchise history. Nice coincidence, that. Starting with Seattle's stirring comeback to win the AL West in 1995 and run to the AL championship series, the Mariners went to the playoffs in four of seven seasons and three times reached the ALCS. And yet ... Seattle won a record-tying 116 games in 2001, but fell to the New York Yankees in the postseason. In five games ...

“Through all the good times and the not-so-good times on the field since 1984, the goal always has been to win the World Series,” Armstrong said. And yet ... “My only regret is that the entire region wasn't able to enjoy a parade through the city to celebrate a world championship together.” The entire region's regret, too.

The 2001 season was the last time the Mariners reached the postseason and the 12-year drought has brought criticism to Seattle's front office. Again, we were critical much earlier. Fans have soured on a product that has eight losing seasons in the past 12 years. And the worst offense since the advent of the DH: Don't forget that. A club that once sold-out Safeco Field with regularity last year had just one in 81 home games. That lone sellout came on the night the club honored Griffey. Our glory is in the past, and it's not that glorious.

“Thanks to our outstanding ownership, the franchise is stable and will remain the Northwest's team, playing in Safeco Field, a great ballpark and great example of a successful public-private partnership,” Armstrong said. Until they threaten to move again. See: Turner Field, Cobb County. “The team is in good hands and positioned for future success. I am thankful for this important part in my life.” And we are thankful for this speech. Now where's Howard Lincoln's?

Howard Lincoln, Chuck Armstrong, gotta go

Griffey Night.

Posted at 12:37 PM on Dec 03, 2013 in category Seattle Mariners
Tags: , , ,
No Comments yet   |   Permalink  
Wednesday September 18, 2013

Why Jack Zduriencek is Not Billy Beane

From David Schoenfield's ESPN.com blog, in the post “The Mariners' historically awful defense”:

At this point, it's pretty obvious: Jack Zduriencek is not Billy Beane. Maybe that's unfair to say; maybe no general manager is Billy Beane. As Dave Cameron pointed out on FanGraphs, even the Rays have spent more on big league payroll than the A's the past two seasons and yet the A's have won 10 more games.

Seattle Mariners logoYou can argue the A's have been lucky — nobody expected Josh Donaldson or Brandon Moss to be this good, or Bartolo Colon to resurface as an elite pitcher. But the A's also have a plan; as Joe Sheehan pointed out this week on his podcast, the A's target a certain type of player (Colon being the big — literally — exception): Players 25 to 29 years old, the age at which they should either break out or have a career year. Look at the current ages of the players they've added in the past two years: Moss (29), Jed Lowrie (29), Yoenis Cespedes (27), Josh Reddick (26), Chris Young (29), John Jaso (29). OK, Seth Smith is now 30 and closer Grant Balfour is 35. Other than Cespedes, those were all players considered disposable by their former teams. Individually, they don't look that impressive; collectively, they're a team.

Now look at who the Mariners added this offseason: Raul Ibanez (41), Aaron Harang (35), Jason Bay (34), Kelly Shoppach (33), Joe Saunders (32), Mike Morse (31), Kendrys Morales (30). That's not a plan. That's a tragedy.

Posted at 03:56 PM on Sep 18, 2013 in category Seattle Mariners
Tags: , , ,
No Comments yet   |   Permalink  
Wednesday August 14, 2013

Photo of the Day

I should've written something about Ken Griffey being inducted into the Mariners Hall of Fame, but I've written a lot about Junior over the years and didn't really have much to add. I'll wait three years for the biggee.

Even so, this was a big day for Mariners fan, including Jon Wells, publisher, editor, etc., of The Grand Salami, the official alternative program for The Seattle Mariners since 1996, who dug deep in his pockets and came up with the dough for this flyover message:

Lincoln and Armstrong Gotta Go

(Click on the image for a better read.)

Longtime readers know how much I agree.

Posted at 03:08 PM on Aug 14, 2013 in category Seattle Mariners
Tags: , , , ,
No Comments yet   |   Permalink  
Saturday July 27, 2013

Seattle Mariners: 30th No More

Going to the M's game today with Tim, and it's not just the sunny weather that's got me in a good mood.

Here are the M's OBP/SLG/OPS splits, along with their OPS MLB rank (1-30), since 2010:

  • 2010: .298/ .339/ .637 (30th)
  • 2011: .292/ .348/ .640 (30th)
  • 2012: .296/ .369/ .665 (30th)
  • 2013: .310/ .401/ .711 (18th)

That sound you hear in Seattle isn't just Macklemore recording on top of Dick's; it's runs being scored. It's an exhale. It's climbing out of a deep, deep hole.

UPDATE: Oops. The M's scattered six hits over nine innings and lost 4-0. When the opposition went ahead 2-0, the game seemed lost forever. Two runs? How could anyone ever manage that? Kendrys Morales hit a rocket double to the right-field corner with nobody out in the bottom of the 2nd but only managed to get to third because of a wild pitch. After that, five singles: one in the 3rd, one in the 7th, two in the eighth and one in the ninth. Just like old times.

Kyle Seagar, Raul Ibanez, lead M's charge

Kyle Seager leads the M's with a .292 average and .356 OBP; Raul Ibanez leads with 24 homeruns.

Posted at 11:30 AM on Jul 27, 2013 in category Seattle Mariners
Tags: ,
No Comments yet   |   Permalink  
All previous entries
 RSS    Facebook

Twitter: @ErikLundegaard

ARCHIVES

All previous entries

LINKS
dative-querulous