erik lundegaard

Quote of the Day posts

Monday August 04, 2014

Quote of the Day

“Just one year ago, Republicans were talking about passing their own version of the DREAM Act. Tonight, they put the party on record for the total cessation of Barack Obama’s quasi-DREAM Act. The arc of history is long, but it bends toward Steve King.”

-- David Wiegel, Slate, “Republicans Finally Pass a Border Bill: So What's In It?” on the 11th-hour House bill, which offers 1/5 of the resources that Pres. Obama requested, along with deportation of the half a million DREAM Act kids, to address the child migrant issue. Andrew Sullivan adds, “It won’t pass the Senate, of course, but it gives House Republicans a Potemkin vote they can cite when they face their Hannityed constituents this month.” Ick ick ick.

Posted at 04:31 PM on Aug 04, 2014 in category Quote of the Day
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Saturday August 02, 2014

Quote of the Day

“We’re not talking enough about income inequality. We’re not talking enough about how in God’s name could you talk about a $5.7-trillion additional tax cut, for Christ’s sake. How can we continue to say a twenty-per-cent tax on carried interest is fair? Why the hell aren’t we talking about earned income versus unearned income?”

-- Vice-President Joe Biden in Evan Osnos' New Yorker profile, “The Evolution of Joe Biden.” It's a good read. You understand where he is similar to Pres. Obama (compromise over ideology) and where he is different (most obviously: hot vs. cold, gabby vs. reticent, careless vs. careful). You also understand why he probably won't run for president in 2016 despite a life-long urge to hold the position. Not to mention a fear of retirement. 

Posted at 10:57 AM on Aug 02, 2014 in category Quote of the Day
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Thursday July 31, 2014

Quote of the Day

“Stay gangster, Joe! I dig you, man.”

-- Unnamed student after Vice-President Joe Biden delivered the commencement address at the University of Delaware, May 2014, as reported in Evan Osnos' excellent New Yorker profile, “The Evolution of Joe Biden.” According to Osnos, after the shout, “Biden looked up, pleased but perplexed ... He waved and kept walking.” But I agree. I dig him, man.

Joe Biden

Posted at 11:44 AM on Jul 31, 2014 in category Quote of the Day
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Wednesday July 30, 2014

Quote of the Day

“William Bendix, who played the Babe in 'The Babe Ruth Story' is my personal favorite [actor who played Babe Ruth], for nostalgic reasons. I first saw the movie with my dad, who was a sucker for this kind of schmaltz. And it’s a fun movie to watch, with just the slightest hint of authenticity—Bendix was a Yankees batboy during Ruth’s prime years in the 1920s. In the movie, his over-the-top, obstinate pointing to outer space (as opposed to center field) before hitting the famous 1932 'called shot' home run against the Cubs in the World Series is hilarious. The pitch Bendix hits comes down like a slow-pitch softball floater, and his uppercut would have made Mike Tyson proud.”

-- Jerry Grillo, “Babe as Babe: Nobody does it better,” as he sorts through the various actors who played Babe Ruth and goes with an inspired choice. 

Babe Ruth and William Bendix

Here, Babe Ruth shows William Bendix how to swing ... or gets ready to kneecap him.

Posted at 11:56 AM on Jul 30, 2014 in category Quote of the Day
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Tuesday July 29, 2014

Quote of the Day

“We are only allowed to live one life: it’s the human condition, there’s no escaping it. In my view, only by studying the humanities can we hope to escape this fundamental limitation and understand how other people live. Because literature, history, or philosophy all provide extraordinary windows on the world. Foreign languages, too, are fundamental.

”The French language gave me an entrée into another culture. It allowed me to discover different means of expression, a different way of life, different values, a different system of thought. Because when you’re a judge and you spend your whole day in front of a computer screen, it’s important to be able to imagine what other people’s lives might be like, lives that your decisions will affect. People who are not only different from you, but also very different from each other. So, yes, reading is a very good thing for a judge to do. Reading makes a judge capable of projecting himself into the lives of others, lives that have nothing in common with his own, even lives in completely different eras or cultures. And this empathy, this ability to envision the practical consequences on one’s contemporaries of a law or a legal decision, seems to me to a crucial quality in a judge.“

-- U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, ”On Reading Proust," interviewed in The New York Review of Books, Nov. 2013. The interview was originally conducted in French and published in La Revue des Deux Mondes in Paris as part of a special issue entitled “Proust vu d’Amérique.”

Posted at 12:44 PM on Jul 29, 2014 in category Quote of the Day
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