erik lundegaard

Quote of the Day posts

Thursday September 18, 2014

Quote of the Day

“Minorities trampled on by the democratic process have recourse to the courts; the recourse is called constitutional law.”

-- Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, in soundly rejecting the state's argument, in Baskin v. Bogan, that courts should defer to the democratic process in, for example, matters of gay marriage. Via Linda Greenhouse's Op-Ed, “The Moment at Hand,” which focuses on the journey of Judge Posner on marriage equality: from “no” to “maybe” to “yes, and now.”

Greenhouse goes on to comtemplate whether Baskin or one of the other same-sex marriage cases, overwhelming confirmed in the federal circuit, will be taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court this session. Overall, her article is celebratory—how far we've come, etc.—but there's a dark corollary of past decisions (from Plessy v. Ferguson to Bowers v. Hardwick) in that celebration: the rights of minorities are indeed protected by the U.S. Constitution from the democratic process ... as long as the minority in question isn't too despised. 

Posted at 07:00 AM on Sep 18, 2014 in category Quote of the Day
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Tuesday September 16, 2014

Quote of the Day

“I know Ronald Reagan’s public statements concerning the Panama Canal contained gross factual errors. ... He has clearly represented himself in an irresponsible manner on an issue which could affect the nation’s security.” 

-- Sen. Barry Goldwater, stumping for Pres. Gerald Ford during thre 1976 Nebraska GOP primary. Reagan won the state anyway while Goldwater eceived profanity-laden hate mail from right-wing conservatives. I know: Goldwater. As recounted in “The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan.”

The Invisible Bridge

Posted at 11:38 AM on Sep 16, 2014 in category Quote of the Day
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Sunday September 14, 2014

Quote of the Day

“We are in real danger of being out-organized by a small number of highly motivated right wing nuts.”

-- from a Pres. Ford campaign memo written about the Reagan camp shortly after Gov. Ronald Reagan's landslide victory (66% to 33%) in the 1976 Texas primary—the greatest defeat ever for a sitting president according to author Rick Perlstein in his book, “The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan.” 

Ronald Reagan campaign button

Some of the groups who were funding Reagan at this juncture, and in the future, included the following:

  • George Wallace’s old American Independence Party 
  • The National Conservative Political Action Committee
  • The National Right to Work Committee
  • The American Medical Association’s PAC
  • The NRA
  • The American Conservative Union
  • The Committee for the Survival of a Free Congress
  • The Heritage Foundation. 

“Many of the members of these groups are not loyal Republicans or Democrats,“ the memo also noted. ”They are alienated from both parties because neither takes a sympathetic view toward their issues. Particularly those groups controlled by Vigurie [sic] hold a ‘rule or ruin’ attitude toward the GOP.” Perlstein then lambasts the Republican establishment, who didn't even know enough in 1976 to spell Richard Viguerie's name correctly. 

More on Viguerie here

Read the book.

Posted at 04:44 PM on Sep 14, 2014 in category Quote of the Day
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Saturday September 13, 2014

Quote of the Day

I read this last Sunday, eating lunch outside at Cafe Presse on 12th, as has been my habit this long summer; then I reread it to Patricia when she arrived (that's also my habit). It's from Rick Perlstein's book ”The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan.“ We're in 1975/76, post-Vietnam, post-Watergate, and a Senate committee run by Sen. Frank Church (D-ID, back when Ds could be from ID) is investigating what exactly the CIA had been doing with our tax dollars in the 1950s, '60s and '70s. Some of the stuff—assassinations of foreign leaders, opening mail of U.S. citizens—isn't particularly palatable, but you get the feeling Americans were more upset by the latter than the former. 

This is the part I reread to Patricia:

It never became any kind of campaign issue; in public opinion polls slightly more citizens disapproved than approved of the Pike and Church committees, and a majority feared they'd harmed national security.

That's why Jason Bourne is the perfect American hero. He's a CIA supersoldier who does the dirty work, then develops amnesia. He's keeps us both safe and innocent.

READ ALSO:

Posted at 11:59 AM on Sep 13, 2014 in category Quote of the Day
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Friday September 12, 2014

Quote of the Day

“How could anyone hate the Royals? It’s like hating Charlie Brown.”

-- Joe Posnanski, in his post, “Yo Joe! Unanimity, Stadium Names and Field Goals,” responding to a Cleveland reader who says over and over how much he hates the Royals.

Peanuts McCovey

Why couldn't Brett have hit just one more triple?!?

Posted at 11:22 AM on Sep 12, 2014 in category Quote of the Day
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