erik lundegaard

Movies - Awards posts

Friday February 22, 2013

38e cérémonie des César: Amour, Amour, Amour

The French held their Academy Awards today and it was all about Michael Haneke's “Amour,” which won best picture, director, actor, actress, and original screenplay. It did the “Cuckoo's Nest,” in other words.

“Rust and Bone” (“De rouille et d'os”), my favorite film of 2012, which was nominated in nine categories, won best adapted screenplay and best rising star (male).

“Argo” won best foreign film (it's the year for movies beginning with “A”), while Kevin Costner was given a career achievement award.

The results en francaise:

  • Meilleur film: Amour
  • Meilleur réalisateur: Michael Haneke pour Amour
  • Meilleur acteur: Jean-Louis Trintignant pour le rôle de Georges dans Amour
  • Meilleur actrice: Emmanuelle Riva pour le rôle d'Anne dans Amour
  • Meilleur acteur dans un second rôle: Guillaume de Tonquédec pour le rôle de Claude dans Le Prénom
  • Meilleure actrice dans un second rôle: Valérie Benguigui pour le rôle d'Elisabeth dans Le Prénom
  • Meilleur espoir masculin: Matthias Schoenaerts pour le rôle d'Ali dans De rouille et d'os
  • Meilleur espoir feminine: Izïa Higelin pour le rôle de Louise dans Mauvaise Fille
  • Meilleur scénario original: Amour – Michael Haneke
  • Meilleure adaptation: De rouille et d'os – Jacques Audiard et Thomas Bidegain, adapté du recueil de nouvelles Rust and Bone de Craig Davidson
  • Meilleur film étranger: Argo de Ben Affleck
  • Kevin Costner pour l'ensemble de sa carrière.

Emmanuelle Riva won best actress in Michael Haneke's "Amour" at the 38th annual Cesars in Paris

Emmanuelle Riva won best actress in Michael Haneke's “Amour” at the 38th annual Cesars in Paris.

Posted at 05:31 PM on Feb 22, 2013 in category Movies - Awards
Tags: , , , ,
No Comments yet   |   Permalink  
Sunday February 10, 2013

Bafflingly British BAFTAs Honor 'Argo,' 'Amour'

For many, the British Academy Awards, the BAFTAs, are simply harbingers of the Academy Awards, the proper awards, which are doled out in two weeks; but I'm kind of fascinated by the number of best pictures the Brits give out:

  • Best Film
  • Best Film Not in the English Language
  • The Alexander Korda Award for Outstanding British Film of the Year

The last one, mostly. Imagine if the Academy gave out a best film and a best American film: say, the Louis B. Mayer Award for Outstanding American Film of the Year. It's inconceivable, really.

The BAFTAs actually began this way—Best Film from Any Source and Best British Film—way back in 1948, but it dropped Best British Film in 1968 when four of its last six Best Films were also Best British Films: “Lawrence of Arabia,” “Tom Jones,” “Dr. Strangelove,” and “A Man for All Seasons.”

At the 1983 awards ceremony, “Best Foreign Language Film” was introduced, and by the end of the decade the language was amended to the politically correct phrase currently used. The best British film award, now named for Alexander Korda, started up again for some reason in 1993.

Immediately it was a bit odd. “The Crying Game” won the Brit award that year while the best film went to “Howard's End,” which is monumentally British. The BAFTAs keep doing this. Here's a list of BAFTA Best Films that didn't also win the Alexander Korda award for Best British Film—even though they're supremely British:

  • “Four Weddings and a Funeral”
  • “Sense and Sensibility”
  • “The English Patient”
  • “The Full Monty”
  • “Shakespeare in Love”
  • “The Queen”
  • “Atonement”

The movies that win Best British Film seem to be smaller films, indies (“Shallow Grave,” “Secrets & Lies,” “Elizabeth,” “This is England”), so maybe that's the distinction. But you can be nominated for both: “Les Miserables,” for example, was nominated in both categories this year.

It won neither, by the way. Here are the winners at the 2012 BAFTAs:

  • Best Film Argo
  • Best British Film Skyfall
  • Best Film Not in the English Language Amour
  • Best Director Ben Affleck, Argo
  • Best Actor Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln
  • Best Actress Emmanuelle Riva, Amour
  • Best Supporting Actor Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained
  • Best Supporting Actress Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables
  • Best Original Screenplay Django Unchained
  • Best Adapted Screenplay Silver Linings Playbook
  • Best Animated Film Brave
  • Best Documentary Searching for Sugar Man
  • Best Editing William Goldenberg, Argo
  • Best Costume Design Jacqueline Durran, Anna Karenina
  • Best Cinematography Claudio Miranda, Life of Pi
  • Best Original Music Thomas Newman, Skyfall
  • Best Visual Effects Bill Westenhofer, Guillaume Rocheron, Erik-Jan De Boer, Donald R. Elliott, Life of Pi
  • Best Production Design Eve Stewart, Anna Lynch-Robinson, Les Misérables

Don't get either screenplay award. Can't fault either lead actor award. Plus the Brits had the sense to nominate Marion Cotillard.

As for harbinger? BAFTA's best picture has been the Academy's best picture for the last four years (“The Artist,” “The King's Speech,” “The Hurt Locker,” “Slumdog Millionaire”) but disagreed the previous four. So who knows? Even so, another win for “Argo,” my ninth-favorite movie of 2012.

Ben Affleck, best director, BAFTAs

How do you like me now, Academy?

Posted at 05:50 PM on Feb 10, 2013 in category Movies - Awards
Tags: ,
No Comments yet   |   Permalink  
Saturday February 02, 2013

Ben Affleck Wins DGA

The line from the Directors Guild of America Award for best director to the Oscar for best director to the Oscar for best picture has been fairly straight over the years.

In the 1990s, we had two stumbles: Ron Howard (“Apollo 13”) won the DGA but he wasn't nom'ed for the Oscar. As a result, the Oscar's best director and best picture went to Mel Gibson and “Braveheart” instead. Then in 1998, Steven Spielberg won both the DGA and the Oscar for best director but his picture, “Saving Private Ryan,” in one of the greatest upsets in Oscar history (engineered by Harvey Weinstein, of course), went to “Shakesepare in Love.” Blah.

In the first decade of the 21st century, we had even more stumbles. 2000 was all over the place: Ang Lee (“Crouching Tiger”) got the Directors Guild of America logo (DGA)DGA, Steve Soderbergh (“Traffic”) got the Oscar, but the best pic went to “Gladiator.” In 2002, Rob Marshall (“Chicago”) got the DGA, and his picture, “Chicago,” got the Oscar, but the best director Oscar went, deservedly to Roman Polanski (“The Pianist”). Then there was the mess of 2005: DGA and Oscar to Ang Lee for “Brokeback Mountain,” best pic to “Crash.” Don't get me started on that one.

Since? The line hasn't been broken.

This year it will be. The winner of the DGA tonight was Ben Affleck for “Argo”; and since he hasn't been nominated for an Oscar for best director, it's gotta go to someone else—most likely Steven Spielberg.

As for best picture then?

Well, the last time a director won the DGA and hadn't been nominated for an Oscar was Ron Howard in 1995. Mel Gibson and “Braveheart” were the beneficiaries that year. Could Spielberg and “Lincoln” be the beneficiaries this year? No pun intended on “ben.”

On the other hand, since the advent of the SAG-cast award in 1996, any movie that won all three of the guilds won the Oscar for best picture: “The King's Speech,” “Slumdog Millionaire,” “No Country for Old Men,” “Lord of the Rings: Return of the King,” “Chicago,” and “American Beauty.”

Here's the guild history:

Year DGA PGA SAG - CAST
2012 Argo
Argo Argo
2011 The Artist The Artist The Help
2010 The King's Speech The King's Speech The King's Speech
2009 The Hurt Locker The Hurt Locker Inglourious Bastards
2008 Slumdog Millionaire Slumdog Millionaire Slumdog Millionaire
2007 No Country for Old Men No Country for Old Men No Country for Old Men
2006 The Departed Little Miss Sunshine Little Miss Sunshine
2005 Brokeback Mountain Brokeback Mountain Crash
2004 Million Dollar Baby The Aviator Sideways
2003 Lord of the Rings Lord of the Rings Lord of the Rings
2002 Chicago Chicago Chicago
2001 A Beautiful Mind Moulin Rouge! Gosford Park
2000 Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Gladiator Traffic
1999 American Beauty American Beauty American Beauty
1998 Saving Private Ryan Saving Private Ryan Shakespeare in Love
1997 Titanic Titanic The Full Monty
1996 The English Patient The English Patient The Birdcage
1995 Apollo 13 Apollo 13
1994 Forrest Gump Forrest Gump
1993 Schindler's List Schindler's List
1992 Unforgiven The Crying Game
1991 Silence of the Lambs The Silence of the Lambs
1990 Dances with Wolves Dances with Wolves
1989 Born on the 4th of July Driving Miss Daisy

Elsewhere in the night, “Searching for Sugar Man” won the DGA for best documentary, Jay Roach won for best movie on television (“Game Change”), and Milos Forman won the lifetime achievement award.

My early bet is split vote: Spielberg and “Argo.” But what do I know? I'm in Seattle.

Ben Affleck in "Argo" (2012)

For the guilds, it's Argo, Argo, Argo.

Posted at 10:54 PM on Feb 02, 2013 in category Movies - Awards
Tags: , ,
No Comments yet   |   Permalink  
Friday February 01, 2013

Joaquin Phoenix Praises Film Crew, Gives Nod to 'Up-and-Comer' Daniel Day-Lewis

“I struggle with the idea of winning awards for acting. Stating I'm Best Actor for something as subjective as film seems strange to me. To the uninitiated it implies I'm solely responsible for the creation and implementation of the character. I am not. I suppose that's why we thank our colleagues. There are those who you all know such as Paul Thomas Anderson, to whom I am eternally grateful – a man who has persistently searched for the truth. I am fortunate to have been under his guidance. Philip Seymour Hoffman for his patience and advice. Amy Adams for being angry. Megan Ellison and everyone at Annapurna for their support of the film and ensuring that I was able to cover my mortgage. But there are many others who you do not know by name such as Mike Kenna, who I believe was the grip but he did 20 different jobs so I can't be sure; Adam Somner, the first assistant director; Karen Ramirez in the office; Tommy – I don't know your last name… there are too many to list. The truth is, you cannot separate my work from their's. We were a unit bolstered by the same goal: to do our part in helping Paul to achieve his vision. I view this award as recognition of all of our work. I am very cognisant of the fact that for me this award is an encouragement to continue my lifelong passion of being an actor. I will not squander this high regard. P.S. There's an up-and-coming actor named Daniel who's in a movie called 'Lincoln.' You should check it out.”

-- Joaquin Phoenix, a non-attendee, in a note of thanks for winning the London Critics' Circle Award for Actor of the Year. Very, very classy. In the same gathering, Jacques Audiard's “Rust and Bone” won best foreign language film. See it.

Joaquin Phoenix in "The Master"

Freddie, by way of Joaquin, Paul, Philip, Amy, Megan, Mike, Karen, Tommy, et al.

Posted at 09:51 AM on Feb 01, 2013 in category Movies - Awards
Tags: , , ,
No Comments yet   |   Permalink  
Sunday January 27, 2013

SAG Cast Award Goes to 'Argo'

Well, that's two of the three guild awards for “Argo.”

I don't agree, given the options (“Lincoln” is an acting tour de force), but the bigger question, or actually the smaller question, is what this means for its chances for the Oscar.

Over the last few weeks, “Argo” has won the Golden Globe, the Producers Guild Award, and now the Screen Actors Guild cast award. Has any movie won all three and not won the Oscar for best picture? Here's a chart (Eventual Oscar winner for best picture in bold):

Year
PGA SAG - CAST GG - DRAMA GG-COMEDY/MUSICAL
2012 Argo Argo Argo Les Miserables
2011 The Artist The Help The Descendants The Artist
2010 The King's Speech The King's Speech The Social Network The Kids Are Alright
2009 The Hurt Locker Inglourious Bastards Avatar The Hangover
2008 Slumdog Millionaire Slumdog Millionaire Slumdog Millionaire Vicky Cristina Barcelona
2007 No Country for Old Men No Country for Old Men Atonement Sweeney Todd
2006 Little Miss Sunshine Little Miss Sunshine Babel Dreamgirls
2005 Brokeback Mountain Crash Brokeback Mountain Walk the Line
2004 The Aviator Sideways The Aviator Sideways
2003 Lord of the Rings Lord of the Rings Lord of the Rings Lost in Translation
2002 Chicago Chicago The Hours Chicago
2001 Moulin Rouge! Gosford Park A Beautiful Mind Moulin Rouge!
2000 Gladiator Traffic Gladiator Almost Famous
1999 American Beauty American Beauty American Beauty Toy Story 2
1998 Saving Private Ryan Shakespeare in Love Saving Private Ryan Shakespeare in Love
1997 Titanic The Full Monty Titanic As Good As It Gets
1996 The English Patient The Birdcage The English Patient Evita

Since SAG started giving out the cast award in 1996, there have only been four years in which the Golden Globe, the SAG and the PGA all went to the same movie. In 2008, they all fell for “Slumdog Millionaire”; in 2003, they all sought out “Lord of the Rings: Return of the King”; in 2002, they lusted after “Chicago”; and in 1999, they dropped dead for “American Beauty.”

All three won the Oscar for best picture.

On the other hand, the director of each film was nominated for and won an Oscar. Ben Affleck, director of “Argo,” was not and will not. Not sure how this changes things.

In other news that ain't much news, and that seems to presage how the Academy will vote, Daniel Day-Lewis, Jennifer Lawrence, Tommy Lee Jones and Anne Hathaway each won individual acting honors.

The big daddy, the DGA, is next week. But right now it's looking good for Ben Affleck.

Ben Affleck in Iran in "Argo"

Ben Affleck: looking good.

Posted at 07:50 PM on Jan 27, 2013 in category Movies - Awards
Tags: , ,
1 Comment   |   Permalink  
All previous entries
 RSS    Facebook

Twitter: @ErikLundegaard

ARCHIVES

All previous entries

LINKS
Movies
Jeffrey Wells
The Film Experience
Roger Ebert
Baseball
Rob Neyer
Joe Posnanski
Cardboard Gods
Politics
Andrew Sullivan
Alex Pareene
Hendrik Hertzberg
Friends
Cloud Five Comics
Copy Curmudgeon
Deb Ellis
Andrew Engelson
Jerry Grillo
Tim Harrison
Eric Hanson
Ben Stocking
Jim Walsh
dative-querulous